The United States Census Bureau is a federally appointed agency responsible for collecting information about Americans. The Bureau uses surveys, commonly known as the United States Census, to collect demographic information at different intervals of time to collect key information and ensure when it’s published, it is as current as possible.

This year, the U.S. Census Bureau is conducting the Decennial Census of population and housing, which is only conducted every 10 years. Each household is required by law to respond and provide the requested information either online, by phone or by mail as indicated within the notices sent. Once complete, the results will be disseminated to the President, the States, and the American People in order to:

  • Direct billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities for schools, roads, and other public services. Serves to help the community prepare to meet transportation and emergency or disaster preparation.
  • Determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and Americans’ political representation at all levels of government.
  • Provide to the states to use for redistricting, as communities rely on census statistics to plan for a variety of resident needs.

In March, American households should have received two letters inviting them to participate in the 2020 Census by responding to the survey online. Americans who did not respond were mailed a reminder postcard and a third letter that included a paper survey. Americans who did not respond after receiving a paper survey, were sent a final reminder during the week of April 20.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, households who have not responded after the final reminder, will be visited by a Census Bureau interviewer to collect answers in person between May 27 and August 14.

The 2020 Census is available online, by phone or by mail in English and 12 additional languages covering 99% of American households.

If you are interested in learning more about the 2020 Census, speak with a Community Resource Specialist: (408) 350-3200, option 1.

Lung Cancer Screening

Medicare Part B covers lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) if the individual meets all the following criteria:

  • Aged 55 to 77
  • No signs or symptoms of lung cancer
  • Current smoker or quit smoking within the past 15 years
  • Tobacco smoking history averaging one pack per day for 20 years (“20 pack-years”)
  • An order from a doctor or healthcare provider

Take advantage of these preventative services offered by Medicare by asking for them for yourself or your loved one. In this way, older adults can reduce their risk of developing substance abuse disorders or mitigate its effects to maintain healthier lifestyles.

References

  1. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2020, July). Substance use in older adults drugfacts. Substance Use in Older Adults DrugFacts | National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (nih.gov)
  2. gov. (n.d.). Preventive & screening services. preventive services (medicare.gov)

 

This project was supported by the Administration for Community Living (ACL), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $94,686 with 100 percent funding by ACL/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by ACL/HHS, or the U.S. Government.